About your Search

20121121
20121129
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
governments. nhk world a mad ahas the story. >> reporter: the city of ordos rises above the autonomous region. the bulk of the revenue earned in the city came from making cashmere, but the coal mines started operating and making a lot of money. in 2004 city officials began increasing the population of an area to 1 million. since then, they have spent nearly $800 million new condominiums and other buildings. now the area has a lot of high rise buildings including a theater and government offices. not many residents, only about 70,000 people live here. >> all over the city homes but no occupants. so few people to buy them, and in many other parts of china similar projects also fizzled. there they have left the local government with mountains of debt. after the global financial crisis in 2008 central government authorities encouraged local municipalities including ordos to spur the economy. the central officials pushed them to invest more. so the local governments borrowed huge amounts of money. the funds went into real estate but even now many properties are still unsold. at the end of 2010 the
the post-election changes in the house of representatives. >> woodruff: would building walls protect cities like new york from flooding after major storms? hari sreenivasan examines that as part of our "coping with climate change" series. >> as people continue to clean up from hurricane sandy, we look at what it could take to keep this damage from happening again. >> brown: ray suarez updates the health care reform law, as the obama administration issues new rules governing what insurers must cover. >> woodruff: and we close under the bright lights of high school football, where a trail-blazing coach puts her players' studies ahead of practice. >> you won't be playing football. we like to think we have a lot of life to live so you will too and you need to prepare for that. football is kind of just icing on the >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. and with
rebels in congo who have seized the eastern city. a resolution adopted unanimously demands the rebels surrender their weapons and withdraw. the council met on tuesday after several hundred fighters from insurgent group m23 entered the city. the resolution calls for tougher sanctions including an arms embargo on the group's leaders and countries supporting it. the u.n. has already imposed sanctions on m23. the council says rwanda supports the rebels. the security situation in eastern congo remains dire. m23 and other armed groups are fighting to extend their influence in the region. more than 400,000 people in and around goma have been displaced. the n. says mo violence could drastically increase the flood of refugees. >>> thousands of people waiting to go home. tons of debris waiting for disposal. vast tracts of land waiting to be restored. overcoming the challenges of japan's 2011 disaster won't be easy, but step by step, people are moving forward. find out how on "the road ahead" every wednesday at 1:00 p.m. japan time right here on "newsline." >>> a four-legged robot is poised to g
. the bomb had been left under a seat. and predictably on a city center bus, there were many passengers. they became the many injured. the bus bombing came as they were cleaning up after a missile strike in a suburb of tel aviv. an air raid siren had saved the lives of the elderly couple who call this apartment home. bus bombings by compairosn are so terrifying because they come with no warning. this was the first such attack of its kind. this time round, only a ceasefire would give it any chance of being the last. >> woodruff: residents of gaza endured another barrage of air assaults today before the ceasefire was called. john ray of independent television news was on the ground in the territory today. >> reporter: after a week of air strikes, gaza has been pummeled by the most intense barrage yet. under the plumes of smoke and fire, there's a sports stadium israel claims is used to train terrorists. news of that terrorist attack in tel aviv was proclaimed from the minnerettes. sweets were handed out but the celebration soon gave way to worry about israeli retaliation. these people alr
a call by an african regional group to withdraw from the city of goma, where they took control last week. government forces have pulled back to minova, trying to regroup. meanwhile, tens of thousands of people have fled the fighting for makeshift camps in the countryside. aid workers are struggling to provide them with food, clean water, and shelter. the u.n. accuses the neighboring states of rwanda and uganda of secretly backing the rebels, a charge they deny. the estimated damage done by hurricane sandy in new york has risen again to $42 billion. governor andrew cuomo announced the new figure today. it includes $32 billion for repairs and restoration and almost $10 billion more for measures to prevent damage from the next major storm. the state, along with new york city, will ask for federal disaster aid based on the damage tally. one of the legendary bands of rock 'n' roll is marking its golden anniversary. the rolling stones celebrated 50 years last night in london, with the first of five shows in the united kingdom and the u.s. nina nannar of independent television news filed this r
wheels recently raised through the streets of a city in southern japan. competitor from 15 countries took part in the international wheelchair marathon. it was an opportunity for one of jap japan's best wheelchair athletes to show his stuff on home turf and also gave him a chance to reunite with his mentor. >> he holds the wheelchair marathon record for athletes in the severely impaired class. hinrich helped train him. the german athlete holds the same record in the same class. the two men had met at a rehab facility for people with severe disabilities. he was recovering from a terrible car accident when he was 20. they urged him to take part in a wheelchair race. >> translator: he was the one who taught me how to ride a wheelchair and how to operate it during a race. i owe him a lot. >> just before the race the two men reunited at the same rehab center. >> good to see you. >> good to see you. everything all right with you? >> right. >> this time it is him who is coaching young athletes. >> translator: the outside of your thumb joint, there, there, even if it slips, you can relax your han
a ceasefire agreement. in the city, the flags, the rallies, talking up victory. in the countryside, the hamas song is, we're going to bomb tel aviv. but away from politics, what about people, lives disrupted by all this? yesterday we filmed awad and his mum sabbah taking shelter in a school in gaza city. frightened, disorientated, a severely disabled boy caught up in all this. today, diplomacy had delivered. sabbah was at home with the family in atatrah. >> it's good that we're okay. i'm very happy i can't believe it, i'm shivering. that face, sabbah said, means he's feeling happy and safe, and with an arm's round from brother mahmoud, and no sound of an explosion. >> sreenivasan: in israel, reserve troops began moving away from the border with gaza. many israelis were grateful a ground operation had been averted. and a day after a bomb ripped through a bus during the tel aviv rush hour, injuring 27, israel announced it had arrested a suspect, an arab israeli man with ties to hamas. i spoke with stephanie freid, a freelance journalist in tel aviv, a short time ago. stephanie, you're just back
-and-mortar renovation of it's flagship store in new york city. it's also investing in technology to beef up it's online presence. "n.b.r.'s" ruben ramirez caught up with macy's c.e.o. terry lundgren in new york this morning and began by asking him how sales are going. both in store and on-line. >> they're both growing and that's the good news for us and while the online business has been spectacular for macy's for several years, we really look at the consumer as an omnichannel consumer. so she comes in, she does her research on her phone. she decides what store she wants to shop. what items she wants to shop for. maybe going back to her desk and pulling the trigger there. so i think that's what happening today. so the line between online and physical stores is blurred. >> reporter: the past several years consumers have opened their wallets around the holidays but come january it seemed that that optimism faded. what are you expecting come january 2013? >> we've had 11 consecutive quarters of consistent growth of sales and earnings at macy's inc. we've found the formula. a lot of retailers depend on jan
hosni mubark. but today, they were aimed at egypt's new leader. in the coastal city of alexandria, opponents set fire to the offices of president mohammed morsi's political party, the muslim brotherhood. there and elsewhere in egypt today, the president's critics and supporters clashed in the streets over his decree yesterday exempting himself from judicial review, and giving him authority to take steps against "threats to the revolution." morsi, egypt's first freely elected president, took office in june. in recent days, he'd garnered worldwide praise for mediating a cease-fire between israel and hamas. today, he told a supportive crowd outside the presidential palace in cairo that granting himself sweeping powers was necessary to prevent figures from the old regime from halting progress. >> ( translated ): i haven't taken a decision to use it against anyone-- to go against anyone is something that i could never be associated with-- or announcing that i am biased towards anyone. however, i must put myself on a clear path that will lead to the achievement of a clear goal. >> brown
of a recovery home prices went up in most major u.s. cities by 3% in september compared to a year ago. america's ambassador to the u.n. failed to mollify senate critics today on the attack at the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya. susan rice met with republican senators who've criticized her for saying-- five days after the attack-- that anti-american protests were to blame. in fact, u.s. officials already knew it was a terrorist strike. today, rice blamed faulty intelligence. but senator lindsey graham said he was unimpressed. bottom line, i'm more disturbed now than i was before that the 16 september explation about how four americans died in benghazi libya by ambassador rice i think does not do justice to the reality at the time and in hindsight clearly was completely wrong. >> sreenivasan: graham, along with senators mccain and ayotte, have said they'll oppose rice if she's nominated to be secretary of state. but independent senator joe lieberman also met with rice today, and he said he was satisfied with her explanation of events. >> i found her statements to be significant. she was just
held in other cities around the country as workers urge the government to protect them. one of the world's most famous traveled denations. now the idyllic island on southern thailand has plans to lure a growing segment of the mark. thpredinantly buddhist country makes up nearly 25% of the world's population. here's the report. >> seeking sand and thailand's famous hospitality. they include rising numbers of muslim too. from the middle east, india and other parts of southeast asia. one of the annual events shows what the island has to offer muslim guests. visiting the fair, threw his weight behind the plan. >> if we want to cater for all sorts of clients and tourists, we need to be sensitive to their demands. muslims when they travel. with that in mind, halal means permissible. >> this restaurant has -- diners can eat with confidence it uses only permitted ingredients with no pork or alcohol. many tourists find the frequent halal signs reassured. >> i think it's the best place. it has a lot of halal food, restaurants. it's a very nice place. >> a new type of islamic culture h
book. i once called it the center pillar of our culture. >> recently, steinsaltz was in new york city teaching and explaining what is unique about the steinsaltz talmud, his own commentary and extensive background. >> you have here the original hebrew, the translation in english, and then you have, you see, notes about the law. >> with his many books as well as his talmud translation, the rabbi personifies judaism's commitment to learning and to argument as a mns of understanding. >> the idea of the talmud is that you are allowed to ask questions about anything, everything that can be done, encouraging you to ask questions, trying to find answers. >> and the rabbis let her then remarry. even though there was only one witness. >> every day students and scholars around the world study and question and debate the meanings of the torah and talmud and the arguments of rabbis who have studied them. there is no single authority to decide how best to interpret the religious law, but argument over the centuries can lead to general agreement, until the next question and the next argument. stein
: the children and human rights activists gathered this pakistan city to show s solidarity to with her. children have returned to damaged schools. already some classes have resumed. girls go to school without giving into terrorism. malala's will is starting to spread across pakistan. >>> time now to check the world weather forecast. people in northern japan are dealing with a snowstorm. we find out more from mai. >> northern japan is being hammered with this winter storm. let's show you a video from the region. people in northern japan have been dealing with plenty of this blowing snow. this is caused by midwinter like cold air in the upper atmosphere and a wintry pattern and locals were trying to stay out of the way of 130 kilometer the per hour gusts. you can see the traveling is really hazardous at this moment. t's pull back and show you the system will be pulling away from japan. still the pattern will be remaining. gusts of about 120 kilometers per hour will be likely along this coastal areas. of snow we're talking about 40 to 50 centimeters. really this winter storm is going to be batterin
: that and more tonight on nbr! >> susie: federal reserve chairman ben bernanke came to new york city today to send a tough message back to washington-- get your act together. he urged lawmakers and the white house to reach a quick deal to avoid the fiscal cliff, saying it might mean next year could be "a very good one for the economy." ben bernanke didn't endorse any specific tax or spending policies to solve the fiscal cliff, but he urged lawmakers to think creatively. he said an agreement on ways to reduce long-term federal budget deficits could remove road blocks to growth. on the other hand, going over the cliff might mean a recession. on top of that, worries about a deal were already causing trouble. > uncertainty about how the fiscal cliff, the raising of the debt limit, and the longer-term budget situation will be addressed appears already to be affecting private spending and investment decisions, and may be contributing to an increased sense of caution in financial markets. >> susie: wall street and business leaders were pleased that bernanke was talking tough. and they said the fe
the number one threat to his city's economy and disastrous for arizona jobs. >> in arizona, we would lose almost 50,000 jobs immediately. and we know that they're the right kind of jobs. 35,000 of those jobs would be in the defense and aerospace industries and in arizona, those are some of our highest paying jobs. >> reporter: that's the case in regions across the country where the defense industry is strong. one of those is johnstown, pennsylvania. the manufacturers that used to make steel here found new life making things for the u.s. military. but here at j.w.f. industries, defense orders are already starting to decline. they estimate the sequester could lead to a 60% profit cut and layoffs of more than 100 workers. >> we're in small town america. and it's not like we're in the beltway where if you lose this job, you can go to another job. there's another opportunity, you don't have that here. so anyone in the defense industry that's in small town america, is going to have a huge impact. >> reporter: so while all these cuts are one way to help washington get its fiscal house in order,
to theidely followed s&p case/schiller home price index. the survey tracks 20 metropolitan cities, and shows home prices were up 3% year over year in september. compared to august, prices inched up three-tenths percent higher. together, analysts say the numbers add up to a long recovery for housing. >> the housing market has clearly turned the corner and is well on its way to recovery. it's going to be a slow, steady, recovery rather than a booming, explosive recovery, because we still have a few years of distressed inventory we have to work through and some headwinds in the lending market. >> tom: nationally, prices are back to their mid-2003 levels. but they're still down 30% from the peak of the housing bubble. >> susie: last summer's drought fried much of the nation's corn crop, but it didn't scorch interest in owning farmland. in many parts of the corn belt, farmland values jumped 13% over the past three months, according to the chicago federal reserve bank. as diane eastabrook reports, a growing number of investors from pension funds to mutual funds are making farms a hot commodity. >>
york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we want to talk about facebook, social media and the digital revolution. ken auletta is here, he writes for the "new yorker" magazine. his column "the annals of communication" extensively covers the tech giants of silicon valley. in july he wrote a profile of sheryl sandberg called "a woman's place: can sheryl sandberg upend silicon valley's male-dominated culture?" tonight we'll look at where facebook stands, the recovery from the highly disappointing i.p.o., the move towards mobile technology, the enduring concerns about privacy and the competition with google. i am pleased to have ken auletta back at this table to talk about that before we show you an interview i did with sheryl sandberg and marc andreessen who's on the board of facebook. we begin with this question, though. where is facebook today after all the controversy about that i.p.o. >> they're in a very strong position. they've got over a billion users in the world. that -- two months ago it was 900 million users in the world. so they're growing. and they're not yet in china and oth
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)